Who Can Best Help The Homeless?

The photo I showed on my recent Facebook page with people carrying clipboards at a homeless camp in Bucks County, PA was not of officials serving eviction notices to make room for homes for illegal aliens. This was pure satire. 

The photo was from a January 30, 2013 article on Phillyburbs.com of a visit from Penndel Mental Health Center and from the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission. Each organization represents two different paradigms of how to help the homeless:  

    • Penndel Mental Health uses legal dope and psychobabble, cognitive behavioral therapy and virtually puts them out to pasture. They want to fund their program by hook or crook. 
  • Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission counsels them with the Bible and gives them a mission. 

https://www.sott.net/article/257456-More-homeless-camps-discovered-in-Bucks-County-Pennsylvania 

Homeless in Philly_1

A mantra in Bucks County is that homeless people need mental health treatment. Here’s a parody that illustrates this: 

Don’t Think Freely (parody of Buck Owen’s Act Naturally) 

Well, they’re going to put me in the nuthouse 

They want to make a monkey out of me 

They’re going to put me in the nuthouse 

And all they have to do 

Is round up me 

  

Well, they are going have to chase me real far 

They’re going to hunt me and they can’t really tell 

If I really need to be in the nuthouse 

They expect me to play the part for them real well 

  

I hope you’ll come and see me in the nuthouse 

Maybe you can slip me a file in some cake 

I hope you’ll come and see me in the nuthouse 

Where I’m all doped up and can’t think freely 

  

They want to put me in the nuthouse 

That’s because they don’t think I am OK 

Well the only reason that I’m in the nuthouse 

Is that I’m homeless in Bucks County PA 

  

Well, they are going have to chase me real far 

They’re going to hunt me and they can’t really tell 

If I really need to be in the nuthouse 

They expect me to play the part for them real well 

  

I’ll be a homeless collection in the nuthouse 

From the state they want to collect their precious bounty 

I’ll be a monkey caged there in the nuthouse 

Where I’m all doped up and can’t think freely 

  

Well the only reason that I’m in the nuthouse 

Is that  I’m homeless in Bucks County PA 

The only reason that I’m in the nuthouse 

Is  that I’m homeless in Bucks County PA 

  

Dupe-dupe a looney Dupe-dup a looney Dupe-dupe a looney… 

They’re coming to take me away ah-hah he-he ah-hah ah-hah he-he ah-hah he-he… 

 

There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey with The Homeless illustrates the silent battle between worldly, secular psychology and Christianity over how to help the homeless. Available: https://www.amazon.com/There-Are-Homeless-Buck-County/dp/172865209X/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1?keywords=there+are+homeless+in+bucks+county&qid=1555953133&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmrnull 

Update: The photo was from the January 30, 2013 edition of Phillyburbs.com, not June 30, 2013. You may have wondered why people are wearing coats in June. Perhaps Penndel Mental Health Center representatives gave them some legal dope samples and they wore coats in June?

Who Should We Serve?

In a recent interview with the Minister of Silly Walks, R.I. Diculous in Bucks County, PA, I learned the reason for the bogus assertion that the homeless population is shrinking. Mr. Big wants to make room for more illegal aliens, and Bucks doesn’t have the nerve to tell their fearless leader the truth. 

During the BO administration (former President Barry Obummer), a public service TV spot to publicize this move for hope and change in Bucks County was developed.  Accompanying the video, a special adaptation of Hank Williams’ song Move It On Over will play. 

“The homeless sneak in about half past ten 

Pretty soon we won’t let them in 

So move it on over, move it on over 

Move it on over homeless dog because the immigrants are moving in 

We won’t let you homeless in to the woods no more 

Your innovative ways won’t work no more 

So get it on over, move it on over 

Scoot it on over, move it on over 

Move it on over because we fat cats are moving someone else in 

The dumpster here is very small 

But they say it’s better than no home at all 

So ease it on over, move it on over 

Drag your junk over, move it on over 

Move over old homeless dog because our cash cows are moving in 

We told them not to lay around 

Now you let us let dirty deals go down 

So move it on over, drag your junk over 

Move it on over, our cash cows are moving in” 

“The advantage of having illegals moving into Bucks County land is that, not being American citizens, we are not responsible for their welfare.  We are not afraid that they could sue us if they get hurt because we are not obligated to protect them,” Diculous said. 

“We don’t need no stinkin’ protection”, said A. Wetback, who recently crossed the Rio Grande and worked his way into Bucks County. 

Environmentalists adamantly say we should protect illegals.  “The Eagle is our national emblem and should be protected at all costs, especially a sick one, an ill eagle”, said Don Quixote, a local environmentalist. 

For those of you in Doylestown, this is a made up story, a satire. 

In Bucks County, there is more vacant land than homeless Americans. 

“Children from other places take priority over children from our own country?” head of HUD Ben Carson recently challenged Democrats. “They don’t seem to want to answer that question. We have millions of American citizens who have been waiting an average of 2 1/2 years to get housing assistance,” said Dr. Carson, who backs enforcing an existing law that allows only U.S. residents to receive housing benefits.  https://www.lifenews.com/2019/05/24/ben-carson-democrats-are-hypocrites-they-say-they-support-children-but-defend-late-term-abortions/?fbclid=IwAR0DKl13x2kJxI5AM_mXAwsPs4laFc3KSapvixAN-UkXDYjxBxVKe_pst50 

Public officials need to remember that they are in their positions to serve we the people, Americans.  There are too many Americans living right here in Bucks County who need a home.  They do not need a big government program, a babysitting service, or a mental health (legal drug clinic) to help the homeless.  Authorities in Bucks have known about the homeless problem since the late 80’s. In fact, in January, 1988, Bucks County Commissioner Andrew L Warren told the Pennridge Chamber of Commerce that there is a homeless problem in Bucks County, and that “Bucks County government in the 1980’s and 90’s is where we are going to begin to have to find more solutions for issues like this.” 

Speaking of the mental health hustlers and the homeless, here’s a parody a wrote awhile back, before at least some of the mental health hustling programs in Bucks were defunded:  

It’s Public Funding Time (parody of Fats Domino’s Finger Popping Time) 

It’s public (doy-dee doy-dee) funding time 

It is pub lic…funding ty-ime 

I feel so good 

I’m on the public dime 

Hey now hey now hey now hey now 

Here comes Allen here comes Keith 

Allen’s visiting all the homeless sites on his beat 

It’s public (doy-dee doy-dee) funding time 

It is pub lic…funding ty-ime 

I feel so good (dee-doy doy dee-doink) 

I’m on the public dime 

Hey now hey now hey now hey now… 

It seems to be what’s happening to HOST is similar to President Trump cutting the fat and crap from the EPA. Accomplishing the goal of being good stewards of our natural resources can be done less expensively. Likewise, by cutting the programs for mental health removes lots of unwanted fat from a bloated bureaucracy. Penndel Mental Health, for instance, just pumps patients with legal dope and psychobabble: “language that is used by people who talk about mental and emotional problems and that is seen as silly or meaningless: psychological jargon.” – Merriam-Webster 

Addendum to the parody:  

The hustling program was put on a leash 

But that doesn’t stop all the bogus outreach 

Get public funding 

On our dime 

I don’t feel too good 

It doesn’t make the homeless fine 

Hey now hey now hey now hey now 

Here comes new folks a target for the hustler Chris 

They’re an opportunity he doesn’t want to miss 

It’s public (doy-dee doy-dee) funding time 

It is pub lic…funding ty-ime 

I feel so good (dee-doy doy dee-doink) 

I’m on the public dime 

Hey now hey now hey now hey now…  

The homeless population in Bucks County continues to grow. It’s grown since a book about the local homeless was published in November, 2018.  https://www.amazon.com/There-Are-Homeless-Buck-County/dp/172865209X/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1?keywords=there+are+homeless+in+bucks+county&qid=1555953133&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmrnull 

Getting To Know You

As of this morning, “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey with the Homeless” is in the display area in the Grundy Library, Bristol, PA in the Bucks County Free Library system. 

The Bucks library system lists no publisher for the book, which was written after I hung out with the homeless in lower Bucks County, PA for about three years, getting to know them getting to know all about…   After I started hanging with the homeless, I got the idea to write a book, but did now know how. Nevertheless, I worked on it off and on for a few years, including in the nursing home where my dear departed Sandi spend her last days before going home to the Lord. 

Sandi is a particular in the book for the homeless, just as the Joad family is in John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath and reflects the realism of Steinbeck.  I teamed up with Sandi almost a year after I started associating with the homeless and shortly before I became homeless. We became homeless together.   

As I was working on my book, the Lord, in His mysterious ways, put me in touch with author, publisher and speaker Vernita (Neat) Simmons.  Neat commented on an article I had written for FaithWriters.com about the homeless. She asked if I was an author. No, I wasn’t then. Neat edited my material, gave me tips and showed me how to do the mechanics of independently publishing a book, including registering it with the Library of Congress. 

This is my first book. I have a draft for my next book, which argues that people can conquer their voluntary slavery of addiction by turning to God and working through Biblical counsel. I expect to publish this book sometime in the future. The role of the church with the homeless is explored in the current book. 

In my last blog, I listed a few reasons for homelessness. One reason I did not mention is all the costly and time-consuming red tape you have to go through to find a place in areas such as Bucks County. It’s harder to get into an apartment today in Bucks than it was to buy a home in 50s Levittown. 

There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey with the Homeless is available on Amazon.com:  

https://www.amazon.com/There-Are-Homeless-Buck-County/dp/172865209X/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1?keywords=there+are+homeless+in+bucks+county&qid=1555953133&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmrnull 

Are The Homeless Movin’ On Up?

As the number of guests who attend the shared meals for the homeless and those in need continues to grow in Bucks County, PA, the food to feed them is stretched. Sometimes, the gracious hosts are unable to offer seconds. 

Actually, this is a good thing, as some of the guests have been overeating and continue to get fatter.  A few years ago, a homeless friend (now no longer homeless) told me he doesn’t want to be made too comfortable in his homeless situation because it will not give him incentive to move forward, out of being homeless (which he did).  This is analogous to people continually leaving bread for birds, who then can’t fly south for the winter. 

Some people who go to the meals have become quite rotund, which is a polite word for “fat.” Some of them are proud of their big bellies.  

By indulging the homeless in meals that have, to some, become a Roman banquet, the meals provide more than subsistence. Gorging yourself does not give you much motivation to leave the nest. 

Parks in Bucks County have posted rules not to feed the waterfowl, a tradition almost as dumb as smoking. Migrating waterfowl, instead of continuing on their journey south, may stop in route where they can get welfare. Here they grow so fat that they can’t fly south! They have trouble even getting off the ground! 

http://wildlifecenter.org/sites/default/files/Consequences-of-feeding-wild-ducks-in-public-parks.pdf 

Like the waterfowl, needy people need to stick to basics, and continue their journey, and not get stuck in a rut, like the characters in John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress. In the story, the characters, who were just supposed to take a nap on their way to the Celestial City, lingered, and had to suffer the consequences. God, of course, guided them along The King’s Highway, home. 

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/pilgrims/summary.html 

We are all homeless, in a sense. For the Christian, heaven is home. We are just sojourners on this earth and we shouldn’t get too caught up in the things of this world. Easter is a reminder that Jesus rose from the grave to overcome death to save us from our sins and to follow his ways in life to advance His kingdom. God restores us to the way he created us. 

Easter is not about the bunny; it’s about the lamb! 

I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” -John 16:33 

Who the homeless really are and their challenges is the subject of my recently published book: “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless”, which focuses on the homeless in lower Bucks County, based on first-hand experience:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR14Y8jAxc462oqzltCCdZGq4BCLQg-HW8VEoAdpkGjog9Q78PqGh6zTTIA 

A Day in The Life of The Homeless

When his mother was being evicted, the son was in jail, charged with reckless driving and driving without a license, which resulted in homelessness, reports an article on philly.com, about the problems of people living in the woods in Croydon.  https://www.philly.com/philly/news/pennsylvania/homeless-shelter-bucks-county-pennsylvania-camps-20181007.html 

Not getting along at a family friend’s place was a reason the mother ended up in the woods. She couldn’t get into the temporary shelter in Levittown.  

People become homeless for various reasons. Drug, alcohol, cigarette, and other addictions is one reason. Some people lose their jobs, sometimes through no fault of their own. 

Public housing is tough to get into. It often takes years to get a place through the government. And the availability and price of private housing is another obstacle to finding a place in Bucks County. Irresponsible roommates, deadbeats is yet another. Because of the excessive red tape from government regulations that have strangled society since the days Levittown, PA was built, people must often go through timely and expensive hoops to get a place.      

To overcome obstacles the homeless have to hurdle, the homeless need to know first that they matter and that people have faith that they can move forward.  The mainstream mantra, which by the way voted for Shrillery Clinton, subtly views the homeless as being in a caste system, where they are stuck in their situation. A few years ago, I emailed a Bucks County commissioner to propose an initiative to dedicate county land to build a homeless village, where there are rules, supervision, management – where the homeless help build and manage the community the way any other place would be run – like Dignity Village in Oregon.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dignity_Village 

To help people better understand the homeless and to shed light on the homeless, focusing on Bucks County, PA, I published a book “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless,” based on my interaction with the local homeless and on research: 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR14Y8jAxc462oqzltCCdZGq4BCLQg-HW8VEoAdpkGjog9Q78PqGh6zTTIA 

Getting to Know You

Lately I’ve been watching the old Lone Ranger episodes in the morning. At the end of each episode, after The Lone Ranger and Tonto (not that Army ranger) save the day, someone asks “who is that masked man?”  The response: “Why, he’s the Lone Ranger”, says someone in the know. Today people don’t even bother to ask who the homeless are. The typical thinking is, he/she is a homeless person, spoken by someone not in the know. 

Until late winter/early spring 2014, I didn’t know who the homeless really are. But then I could honestly sing “getting to know you, getting to know all about you…” And I learned to like some of the homeless people I got to know.  Shortly before I became homeless myself, I got to know many of the homeless in lower Bucks County, PA.  

Who are the homeless?  The only difference between the homeless and the rest of the population is that they don’t have homes.  They are not akin to the Walking Dead.  We don’t see zombies walking aimlessly looking for people to eat when we enter homeless territory in the woods.  The members of the Bucks County establishment are the Morlocks and the people who vote them in are the walking brain dead. 

They are people like you and I who have had the misfortune of losing their homes, through job loss, fire (in an uninsured house) or for other reasons — in some cases a result of their own irresponsibility and sometimes as a result of a combination of causes beyond their control and irresponsibility. 

One organization that has the right approach, right attitude towards the homeless is the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission. Unfortunately, it’s thrift store in Penndel, PA, the same town whose name is part of the mental health charlatans, Penndel Mental Health Center, is closing. It’s closing so the Sunday Breakfast Rescue Mission can better serve other needy people.

Don’t talk about us; talk with us – slogan coined by homeless people from the organization Picture The Homeless.  Homelessness does not define your character, but is just the particular situation you are in. The common denominator is that, as Clarence “Frogman” Henry sang, they “ain’t got no home.”   

As you’ll see in the video, some homeless people want help for legitimate needs while others want money for things that the not only need, but may be harmful or immoral. This is why it’s best to give the homeless things like food or medical supplies, blankets and not money, unless you’re sure. I’ve given homeless folks I know money to buy a meal at fast food places when we were there and saw them purchase food. That’s OK in my book. 

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=clarence+frogman+henry+aint+got+no+home+video&docid=608005915538293417&mid=EA51CB4DA3A1AFB7ECB1EA51CB4DA3A1AFB7ECB1&view=detail&FORM=VIRE 

The trick is, as a fellow volunteer at a food pantry told me when he knew I was hanging with the homeless, is to distinguish between who you can trust and who you can’t. I’ve learned to sort out the user-losers, who don’t want to help themselves, and the winners, who just want a hand up and who want to help themselves. I explore this in my book, based on my experience with the homeless in lower Bucks County and research. I also explore the prejudice against the homeless. 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR0gPVr_CAM7L0hyxu92hll8KTsLWTUmr1nIEamgTnuc_Hi4yDafBYGcMqs 

People Come Together

Being homeless can be tough, all the reason why the fighting between some members of this community needs to stop. People in this situation need to work together to help one another, as iron sharpens iron. “As iron sharpens iron, so one person sharpens another.” -Proverbs 27:17  I recently learned that two people who are homeless in Allentown, PA have trouble getting necessary items to their camp site, which entails a long, tough haul, including a trek over an abandoned railroad trestle and up a slippery, leaf covered hill. One has broken ribs as a result of another homeless guy he was trying to help and another who was briefly hospitalized for exhaustion and malnutrition.   Back in lower Bucks County, PA, there have been some scraps. At a recently homeless meal, there was a fight between two guys who were homeless. The host, using good judgement to keep the peace, threw one of them out. He had caused problems before. The other was penalized in a different way. Because this behavior was not tolerated, the meals for the homeless and needy continue to be a peaceful place where people can get a good meal and enjoy socializing with friends.   Being homeless does not define your character. It doesn’t mean you have to subscribe to the law of the jungle. “The law of the jungle” is an expression that means “every man for himself,” “anything goes,” “survival of the strongest,” “survival of the fittest,” “kill or be killed,” “dog eat dog” and “eat or be eaten.” The Oxford English Dictionary defines the Law of the Jungle as “the code of survival in jungle life, now usually with reference to the superiority of brute force or self-interest in the struggle for survival.” -from Expedia  One trouble maker was put at bay and now Lying Larry, the loud, belligerent guy who disturbed the meals hasn’t been coming. Caveman Club, by Sancho Panza, was recently given the Lying Larry seal of approval.  A recent ad for Caveman Club: Are women you are trying to pick up at homeless meals getting too difficult to catch? Did another guy take your gal you used to take there? Is the gang of girls you are trying to collect, like Charles Manson, nothing more than a dream?   Well, do as Lying Larry does. He uses Caveman Club to catch his prey.    As Lying Larry says, women don’t have any sense in choosing the guy they want to hang with. Women are incapable of making decisions on their own. They need guidance and persuasion.    Caveman Club also serves to keep the competition away; to keep the gals from making the wrong choice.   Caveman Club.  Don’t go to a homeless meal without one!   Caveman Club, by Sancho Panza.    Seriously folks, the homeless really need to love and care for one another. We should have the peace of Christmas that has been the case at the homeless meals all year round. Everyday people should reach out and help the homeless, both morally and physically. Peace on earth and good will to men!  To learn more about the homeless, there’s a book, by yours truly, “There are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless, available: https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR0gPVr_CAM7L0hyxu92hll8KTsLWTUmr1nIEamgTnuc_Hi4yDafBYGcMqs 

Christmas Comes Once A Year

Christmas comes once a year” 

“And every man must have his share” 

 “Only poor Willy in the jail, drinking sour ginger beer” 

-Famous limerick that plays on the radio in Guyana, South America at Christmastime 

This is the worse time of year, with people running around like the White Rabbit and acting like the Mad Hatter in Alice in Wonderland, getting caught up in the hype and the materialism of worldly Christmas. I think I’d rather be in a jail in Guyana hanging out with Poor Willy rather than being accosted by the incessant ads and other claptrap during the commercial Christmas season. That is, if the jail does not subject its inmates to Christmas hype. That would be cruel and unusual punishment!  

I’d gladly swap sour ginger beer with phony Christmas cheer! 

Last year I camped out at the nursing home at my dear Sandi’s bedside last Christmas season until the Lord took her home December 4, 2017.  No more sorrow, no more pain, and no more Christmas hype coming from Sandi’s roommates’ TV’s.   

Visiting Sandi at the nursing home, where I camped out from late summer to late fall, I learned a lot about what is important in life and about the true meaning of Christmas. I witnessed a change in Sandi, who not only loathed the idea of going to a nursing home, but was tired of being tired. She just did not want to go on.  

After having been in the hospital a few weeks, Sandi was taken to the nursing home. She was taken at night, too late I was told for me to visit her there (I later learned that I was lied to about visiting hours, probably an attempt to keep me from seeing her senile roommates and selecting a new place). When I visited Sandi the next morning, I asked her for the remote so she could select a station. She snapped that there is no remote. I thought she was just being cross, but there was no remote and you just had to change channels on the TV. I asked her if she was angry at me. “Yes”, she said. One day shortly before this, when there was talk about sending Sandi to the nursing home, Sandi quipped “you’re not going to get rid of me that easy!”  

I explained to Sandi it was not my decision to put her in the nursing home; we were not married, yet.  It was a good idea, however, as at that point I wasn’t equipped to properly care for her. 

There were times when I, physically and mentally fatigued with caring for Sandi, I considered putting her in a nursing home. But thanks to our pastor, Abie, with whom I shared my struggle in taking care of Sandi, I decided to devote myself fully to her. Abie asked me, “either be all the way in, or all the way out.” Next time I talked with him I said “Abie, I’m all the way in!” 

And Sandi reciprocated in her attitude. She had the will to live, and reflected Jesus. While other residents in hospice, who had more freedom than she did, were bitter, Sandi was cheerful. You might say she was full of genuine Christmas cheer! It also brought us closer together. I learned the importance of commitment and loyalty, holiday ingredients better than any ginger bread man, the right ingredients to keep man and woman together in peaceful harmony. 

I wrote much of my recently published book “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless” while camped out with Sandi at the nursing home. I learned a lot about life over the static of the commercial Christmas claptrap while visiting the home.  

One thing I learned is how people abandon their loved ones when they are in the nursing home. I expressed my opinion in an article I wrote while in the nursing home on faithwriters.com.  Someone commented on my piece that he was reluctant to visit someone in the nursing home. He explained that the person didn’t return his calls and did not think he would even recognize him. But after reading my article on Faith Writers, he said he was going to go visit the person in the nursing home and leave it all in God’s hands. This is why I like using my God-given gift to write. 

My book is available:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR0gPVr_CAM7L0hyxu92hll8KTsLWTUmr1nIEamgTnuc_Hi4yDafBYGcMqs 

Ah Yes, Seems We’ve Been Here Before!

Holy déjà vu, Batman! Looking at today’s report on levittownnow.com about a camper fire that occurred Sunday night at a used car dealership near Edgely Road and Route 13, Bristol, PA maybe in the same area where vehicles burned as a result of a fiery temper a little more than a year ago.  http://levittownnow.com/2018/11/26/camper-where-homeless-stayed-destroyed-by-fire/ This fire did not do the damage that the fire that happened April 12, 2017. http://levittownnow.com/2017/04/12/police-charge-homeless-woman-vehicle-arson-car-dealership-route-13/ After last year’s fire, where a homeless woman was charged with arson, evidently the dealership, which had graciously allowed people who were homeless to sleep there, no longer had the dealer’s permission to stay there. Unfortunately, it just takes one miscreant to ruin a good thing for others.  Being homeless is no excuse for such behavior – a fiery temper. Self-control is one of the fruits of the spirit. The woman with the fiery temper didn’t behave that way because she was homeless. When particular individuals cause havoc, it sends a negative message about the homeless towards narrow minded people as well as penalizes innocent people in the homeless community. Now I don’t blame the dealership for not allowing the homeless to camp in vehicles in their lot. And the miscreant who caused the camper fire ruins it for those who have nowhere else to go, and who act responsibly. The Bucks establishment doesn’t want to help create an official homeless community, where there are rules, and troublemakers can’t create havoc.  I delve into this subject in my book “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless.”  Available on Amazon.com:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/172865209X/ref=cm_sw_r_fa_dp_U_.iX9BbZXM6842?fbclid=IwAR0gPVr_CAM7L0hyxu92hll8KTsLWTUmr1nIEamgTnuc_Hi4yDafBYGcMqs

The Patience of Job?

After all these years, and technical and editing problems, my book “There Are Homeless In Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless” is allegedly, as of this morning, 72 hours of publication on Kindle Direct Publishing (Amazon).

It’s been a long journey getting my book about the homeless, which focuses on Bucks County, PA, to market. It seems I am just about there, only the waiting doesn’t seem to end, like Maurice Ravel’s Volermo.  Every time I heard my late Dad listen Ravel’s Volermo, he pointed out that the classical tune keeps seeming to come to an end, but it keeps going, until finally… boom! It‘s over. He also remarked that this tune was played to wear prisoners of war down.  Maybe I should rewrite the title to read “Volermo’s Homeless”.

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=volermo+classical+music&view=detail&mid=731DD90AE9097A6F2B7E731DD90AE9097A6F2B7E&FORM=VIRE

My quest to write a book about the homeless started back late winter/early spring 2014, after I met the local homeless in Levittown, PA at a homeless meal at the Salvation Army and got better acquainted with them at the local library and Veteran’s memorial by the library.  I started writing stuff about the homeless and stored it on my laptop. In time, a guy who wanted to start a non-profit to create much needed shelter for the homeless set me up on a WordPress blog site. We had trouble launching the non- profit and realized the main problem to do this was hobophobia, the irrational fear of the homeless, prejudice, stereotyping.

So I wrote blogs to educate the public about who the homeless really are.

At one point I started to write a book about the homeless in Bucks County. I wrote much of the draft of my book in a nursing home when my dearest companion Sandi was there.

I started writing articles on different subjects on FaithWriters.com.  Author/Publishing Consultant & Speaker Vernita (Neat) Simmons commented on an article I posted on Faith Writers about the homeless. She asked if I was an author. I told Neat I wasn’t but that I wanted to write a book on homelessness. The rest is history. Neat edited my manuscript, made suggestions and helped me with the mechanics associated with publishing a book. She also encouraged me. I could not have done it without her.

A friend, a graphics artist from my church volunteered to do my cover. I sent him photos I had taken and he embellished the one for the front cover, greatly enriching it and helping to visually introduce my story. Neat really liked Bill’s work and will recommend him if someone needs his services. He said he contributed to what he saw as a noble cause.

God is teaching me to be more patient. I’m blessed to have my Christian brothers and sisters there for me as my patience runs thin. I learned patience dealing with Sandi. Although she tried my patience, I really loved her. Rather than bail out, I learned to work it out with her! Sandi is the main particular/character of my book which is a combination story and exposition. I also learned patience with Katherina, not her real name, whom I started seeing about 1 ½ months after God took Sandi home. I choose to call her Katherina based on the Katherina in Shakespeare’s “Taming of The Shrew.”  Katherina has the same role in my next book, which I am now writing, as does Sandi in my current, soon to be published book. Once tamed, my Katherina was as sweet as the Katherina in the Shakespeare play.