Coming Out of The Closet

On Tuesday, I thought I took the final step on Kindle Direct Publishing (Amazon) to finally bring my book, “There Are Homeless in Bucks County; A Journey With The Homeless” out of the closet and available to the public for all to see. My publishing consultant, Vernita “Neat” Simmons gave me a heads up that I needed to take another step – my book was not ready for publication. So earlier today I took that step and my book should be on the market within 72 hours. But there’s another delay! Maybe time to change self publishing companies!

I could have never hoped to get a book published without Neat. Writing is one thing (although she is a good editor), but the monster problem is the administrative and technical issues.

Up until about three years ago, the only real life image I had of the homeless was when my daughter and I were walking in Philadelphia and had to navigate around several homeless people who were sleeping on heated grates.  A somewhat less than real life image I had of the homeless was driving through Skid Row, Philadelphia. As Neil Young sang “There’s more to the picture than meets the eye. Hey, hey, my, my…”

keep hearing stories where caring people plan to provide housing for the homeless but are thwarted by the establishment, even when the projects will be privately funded. I’ve found this to be the case in Bucks County, PA and in Burlington County, New Jersey The biggest obstacle to creating housing for the homeless is hobophobia, the irrational fear of the homeless.  Many people are prejudice against the homeless, driven my homeless myths.  Housing first is another issue, which my book gets into.  http://thhi.org/about-homelessness/myths-about-homelessness/

There Are Homeless in Bucks County, based on personal experience and research, has been a long time in the making. Coming soon. Details to follow.

No Direction Home?

You can take people by the hand, but you can’t pull them. It’s noble to reach out to people who need a helping hand. But in some cases, they don’t want to listen to advice or follow the right path.

After people visited him in the hospital, worked hard to get him in a nursing home, moved his worldly  possessions  from his sold home into storage, counseled and encouraged him to straighten out and tried to get him into more programs to help him overcome his besetting sin of chronic drunkenness, he walked away from the nursing home. When he was distraught around the public library in Levittown, PA our friend in the homeless and needy community in Bucks County, PA, a police officer encouraged him to return to the nursing home. He didn’t.

At Tuesday night’s community meal for the homeless and those in need, our friend was greeted by his friends. He thanked those who have been helping him.

The reason for bolting from the nursing home? He described it as being quite filthy. I find that dubious, as do others.

He told me he planned to find a hotel and drove away from the dinner. The social worker he was working with, he said, was looking for a room for him.

Now, he’s on his own, with no direction home, as Bob Dylan sang. https://www.bing.com/search?q=bob+dylan+like+a+rolling+stone+video&qs=RI&pq=like+a+rolling+stone+bob+dylan+video&sc=4-36&cvid=03A1BA8266F8423E8DB414525C1D72E4&FORM=QBRE&sp=1

The man needs to be sequestered in a home, where he can get the treatment, mostly counseling, that he badly needs, as well as a place where he has to stay away from the bottle and cigarettes, which he craves.

A few years back, I kept company with a homeless woman who had just walked away from her husband, a well-paying job, fancy cars and a great house in an upscale neighborhood. She was well educated. The woman was leery of going to the homeless meals, as she thought people didn’t like her being there. I encouraged her to go, and we often went to the meals together. I also brought food to her tent, as she was quite thin and may have gotten thinner.

For awhile, we did positive things such as discuss books we got out of the local library, would reference books we’ve read, talked about art…  She got a job but was fired, accused of being involved in a stealing ring. She had a problem with the bottle, and soon returned to heavy drinking, and habitually stole things. She sometimes broke down crying, lamenting to me that she was homeless.

Drunkenness, like other crutches to escape life, leads nowhere. A problem drinker’s girlfriend and I used to say that he thinks the answer to problems is in the bottle. He may think that a genie will pop out and say “your wish is my command.”

Actually, the bottle abused is a tyrant! It’s an example of pursuing something that entices you but brings you to despair, as Bob Dylan sang about the youth who left their comfortable homes in search of something better. The grass was no only not greener – it was brown!

People who engage in destructive behavior such as drunkenness can lose their jobs, their houses, family and other relations with people. They are so enamored with the bottle that it become more important than anything else.

As a result of his heavy drinking, Dr. Robert Smith, aka Dr. Bob, one of the Alcoholics Anonymous founders, almost didn’t finish medical school and put his business and family life jeopardy. But with God’s help and through AA programs, after staying with the program, Dr. Bob was able to put this destructive behavior at bay. The 12 Step program grew out of Alcoholics Anonymous, which continues to be a successful program. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Alcoholics_Anonymous

Who has woe? Who has sorrow? Who has strife? Who has complaining? Who has wounds without cause? Who has redness of eyes? Those who tarry long over wine; those who go to try mixed wine. Do not look at wine when it is red, when it sparkles in the cup and goes down smoothly. In the end it bites like a serpent and stings like an adder. Your eyes will see strange things, and your heart utter perverse things. …” – Proverbs 23:39-35

The Midnight Special

“Let the Midnight Special shine her light on me
Let the Midnight Special shine her ever-loving light on me”

-Lyrics from The Midnight Special, a traditional folk song believed to have originated from prisoners in the American south.

Throughout the years, several artists have recorded the song, including blues singer Huddie William Ledbetter, aka Lead Belly, Johnny Rivers and Creedence Clearwater Revival.

One interpretation of The Midnight Special is that it was a song about a train from Houston shining its light into a cell in the Sugar Land Prison. The light of the train is a metaphor for salvation; the train could take the inmate away from the prison walls if it shines on him. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midnight_Special_(song)

The Bible also uses light as an image for salvation and freedom. John Chapter 1, verses four and five: “In him was life, and that life was the light of all mankind.  The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it. “

When you come into God’s light you start acting more like Christ and let your light shine for others to see.

In the opening of the book, John relates that God made all things, including humans. God breathed life into man, creating him in his image. Humans are a special creation and therefore have intrinsic value – that is, the have value just for being a creature made by God. When people don’t believe this, humans are only valued for what they have or can do. This is the case for the homeless in Bucks County, PA, where just because people don’t have jobs, a position in society, or homes, they are considered useless, collectively a persona non grata.

In the Levittown public library, the head librarian has been on a campaign to constructively remove the homeless from the library.  You would think the local Salvation Army, as they did back in the day, would value the down and out as creatures created by God, but the Countess of Carlisle, public relations person for the Salvation Army, told me that some people who visit the library don’t like the homeless there, and that the librarian has the right to shew them just because people don’t like them. As was the case with the early churches being polluted by pagan thought, the Levittown branch of the Salvation army evidently has been contaminated by secular liberalism.

For those of you in Doylestown, the Countess of Carlisle was an historical figure for whom was said “Though she worked hard to improve the working-class people’s living conditions, she was an elitist who resented their role in democracy.” https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosalind_Howard,_Countess_of_Carlisle#Views_and_causes

Bucks County may as well round the homeless up, usher them through corridors past a visual montage of pristine forests filled with homeless camps, past the rotating knives, where the homeless are churned into green wafers as was done in the movie Soylent Green. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_Green

This way the homeless become useful; they would be helping to keep Bucks County Green.

Without giving any reason, Bucks County said that Stand Down, the annual event that sets up on county administered land behind the Levittown public library for homeless and needy veterans, will no longer be.  This would not enhance Bucks County’s desire for personal peace and prosperity.

Meanwhile, as Christmas approaches, people are trying to find peace through drugs. In Bristol Township, cops found 445 bundles of what they believe is heroin after they stopped a guy who was chasing a woman, driving through neighborhoods shooting at her. The dope pusher must have believed there were a lot of customers in the area. It certainly wasn’t Mr. Rodgers Neighborhood!  http://levittownnow.com/2016/12/21/cops-find-445-bundles-of-heroin-while-investigating-drive-by-shooting/

Maybe the dealer was filling an order to help people deal with the calamity of the recent election. They must have heard that Calamity Donald was in town and need something to calm them down. Maybe the 445 bundles were heading to the Penndel Mental Health Center.

This is what happens when people run away from the light and live in darkness. They don’t want to take David Bowie’s advice and run from the shadows!

Remember this season that there is hope. Let the Midnight Special shine its ever loving  light on you!

“The people dwelling in darkness have seen a great light, and for those dwelling in the region and shadow of death, on them a light has dawned.” -Matthew 4:16

The Homeless and Kafka’s Cockroach

In my psychology in literature class in college, a classmate said that the moral of Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis is that Gregory, the character in the parable, woke up as a cockroach because he didn’t want to face the world. He didn’t want to face responsibility so he lingered in bed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Metamorphosis

I’ve found the homeless problem in Bucks County, PA, which I’ve been associated with for about two years to be Kafkaesque. For those of you in Doylestown, “Kafkaesque” is defined by Merriam-Webster :  “of, relating to, or suggestive of Franz Kafka or his writings; especially: having a nightmarishly complex, bizarre, or illogical quality <Kafkaesque bureaucratic delays>”. When now Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas was fighting his hi tech lynching, he remarked that the whole ordeal was Kafkaesque.

I also find much of modern psychology to be Kafkaesque.

I just read a very long article: Psychology and The Church. If you are an egghead, and have a free day, you may want to read it: http://inplainsite.org/html/psychology_and_the_church.html

One point I recall from the reading is that the church can relate on a more personal level than typical secular psychology as well as have absolutes, truth which works best to keep people truly in the pink, although this doesn’t happen in a wink. Churches serve God and man well when they share one another’s burdens. Psychology has found that someone experiencing problems knowing that people really care is a big factor in helping them resolve their problems. (Not all psychology is bad).

At the community meal for the homeless and those in need on Sunday, hosts from the church sat down with some of the guests and discussed their concerns. They helped them a lot more than a shrink, including ones from Penndel Mental Health Center. During the time I broke bread with the homeless at community meals and at other venues, I’ve noticed that those who have gone to the secular center didn’t seem to improve over time. In fact, they got worse. Conversely, broken people who followed the Lord appeared to have improved their attitude, reflected in their demeanor. I’ve tried both and found this to be the case.

Modern psychology is reflected in the thinking of some in the Bucks County establishment. Some time ago, I ran the idea by a Bucks County Commissioner to designate county land as an official homeless encampment. The homeless would build and manage the place. There would be rules and leadership. The commissioner responded that this would jeopardize the chances of the homeless to get county assisted housing, which takes between one and two years to get. The commissioner’s answer was Kafkaesque!

She also pushed funding for mental health.

Like Gregory in Kafka’s novella, Bucks County doesn’t want to honestly face the world of the homeless.

Bucks County aggressively canvases to secure taxpayer funds by shanghaiing the homeless and signing them up for mental health services.  The mental health hustlers are everywhere, trying to recruit the homeless like the people in Bob Dylan’s comical song where everybody’s trying to “stone you”. And in essence, with the center’s “medications”, they are stoning you:

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=bob+dylan+everybody+must+get+stoned+youtube&view=detail&mid=0FABCAAA13311BEF362B0FABCAAA13311BEF362B&FORM=VIRE

Throughout the history of the church, there has been a battle between the church and the world. This is evident in Bucks County over the well being of hurting people. I’m on the side of the church.

“And concerning you, my brethren, I myself also am convinced that you yourselves are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge and able also to admonish one another.” -Romans 15:14

Et Tu Veterans?

“I understand what their (the county) concerns are, but I really don’t think their dealing with it the right way. I called the phone number on the signs and there is no more room in the shelters,” said Morris Derry, founder of the nonprofit No More Pain Inc.

Morris said this at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Levittown PA yesterday on the eve of the eviction of the homeless there and the surrounding area.  I was shocked to find that the veterans who showed up at the pow wow at the memorial  yesterday complained about the homeless camping at the memorial.

“It’s a total desecration, what’s going on here,” said Joe Hogan, a Vietnam veteran from Bristol Township. “These are local heroes.”

Another vet remarked that having the homeless stay at the memorial is sacrilege, that it is “sacred ground.”

This is the first time I heard a veteran complain about the homeless at the memorial.  A volunteer from the VFW who used to come to the memorial to clean up once said he doesn’t have much to do because the homeless clean up. One guy, who used to live at the memorial, was well received by the local VFW.

There’s  an ex marine officer who on occasion slept at the memorial with the homeless. He didn’t have a problem with the homeless staying there.

As a Vietnam veteran, I don’t have a problem with the homeless staying at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. There are a few individual homeless people who have caused problems at the memorial, but most of the regulars respect it. Many of the problems, however are caused by people from the nearby shelter, which has a cross section of people there, including druggies and drunks. A few also were living in places such as the nearby woods who were drunk and disorderly at the memorial.

The greatest problem at the memorial, the library, and nearby neighborhoods, are the dopers from the local recovery houses.

It was after the infestation of the recovery houses in the area – there are in the neighborhood of 100 just in Levittown – that security cameras were put in the library as was a security guard. The feds have been dumping the recovery houses on the community, causing more crime. Many of these addicts are from out of town.

One of the regular homeless persons who has stayed at the memorial for some time, as reported in LevittownNow.com,  a woman without a permanent residence who has stayed at the memorial, said there have been some transients who have come into the memorial at night and have caused problems. She said the local homeless population has worked to police themselves and  force those who break the law to leave.

The local homeless population could have done a better job of policing themselves. They are, however, up against a mentality that if one or two people cause a problem, the whole group is to blame.  But one day a druggie from one of the numerous local recovery houses pulled an American flag out of the ground that a veterans group had placed at the memorial. A homeless guy called the security guy at the library, who had a rapport with the local homeless and reported the wonton deed. This disrespectful guy had to put the flag back where he found it and was kicked out of the memorial.

Indeed, this is an example of what the homeless woman told Levittownnow.com.  Druggies come by day; many of then are required to leave the recovery homes during the day.  There is no warning like there was for the Colonials, where the signal that the British were coming was one if by land, two if by sea. Maybe a light at the government center could be flashed when the druggies come during the day and two when they come at night.

The county claims the homeless staying at the memorial was a public safety problem. Public information director Chris Edwards contradicts himself. He said there hasn’t been any major problems reported at the memorial, but in the next breath he says the county has to clear the homeless out because of public safety concerns.

The county claims it tried to work on a solution to the homeless problem.  If you call calling the housing number a solution? A year or two wait? Or Alan Johnson and his gang of mental health hustlers trying to Shanghai the homeless so they can get their taxpayer funds? He acts like Aladdin. Instead of giving new lamps for old, he promises housing for turning yourself and your public funds over to the mental health industry.

A homeless person recently told me that these guys don’t really care about the homeless. It seems many people don’t.

The statement in the Courier Times article by Matt Turner, published yesterday “The veterans said the homeless presence discouraged others from going to the memorial and honoring the fallen,” is bogus. No homeless people discouraged others from visiting the memorial. I think this whole thing is a case of hobophobia, the irrational fear of the homeless.  What they did today — actually talking with the homeless — is something that should have been done all along!

A veteran at the meeting came up with good idea – he suggested “working to find a building to help house those without permanent homes.”

This is what I’ve been saying all along.

We need to put the idea of finding a building to help with permanent housing into action. There’s a lot of vacant property in Bucks County. The old Sunbury Farm’s been sitting vacant after being sold then reverted back to Bristol Township for more than a year. That would make a great home for those without a permanent address.  They could do fix up work – it doesn’t need much, maintain and manage it. Just because people are homeless it doesn’t mean they are hopeless!

We need to go beyond talk and actually implement a plan, rather than just pushing people out as if they were rodents.

No Particular Place to Go

I’ve seen the needle
and the damage done
A little part of it in everyone
But every junkie’s
like a settin’ sun.

— Neil Young from his song Needle and the Damage Done

http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/neilyoung/needleandthedamagedone.html

At my 40th high school reunion, I learned that many kids I knew from school had died as a result of drug overdoses. Today our country is plagued with drug and other addictions. The homeless are no exception.

There is a special problem with drug addicts in the homeless community. As people without a home need to sneak into public and private lands out of need, when, on rare occasion in lower Bucks County, PA, for example, a drug addict overdoses and needs emergency medical help, it calls attention to others hiding from the authorities in the woods, including those who are discreet and have little impact on the land.

In the woods, on land under Bucks County jurisdiction, shelters were put up for feral cats. So if humans who just need shelter are kicked out of the woods because of the actions of others, then why not kick out the cats?

Like illegal aliens, the feral cats are given special privileges. These cats live in a gated community. “No dogs” and “close the gate” is posted at the entrance. So if no dogs are allowed, then if follows that the homeless are also not allowed. Perfect liberal logic.

Outside the homeless community, if a neighbor is on drugs, do all the neighbors get kicked out of the neighborhood? Of course not.

If the homeless could be in legitimate, organized communities, like Dignity Village in Portland Oregon, then problem people would be filtered out, and it would not jeopardize other people, who play by the rules

Bucks County knew about the homeless problem since the late 80’s. The county has done a poor job of resolving it. The solution so far is just to chase the homeless, who scramble for a place to go, away, as if they were hunting down a predator.

People need a place to go. The right place. Like the guy riding in the car in Chuck Berry’s song, people have no particular place to go.

People with addictions need help. But they need to accept the help. This is why people of faith need to reach out and develop relationships with them and help them help themselves. And get them to the right place at the right time.

Today’s society is lost. This is why Christians need to bring light into the world. People have lost direction and borders — they have lost their rudder.

Neil Young saw the problem that starting during the baby boomer age.

A recovering addict recently told me that people who can’t stop their addictions are weak minded. That’s right. But to become strong, we need God’s help to overcome addictions and other character flaws that create problems.

One place to go for help is the Salvation Army’s Adult Rehabilitation program in Trenton. An alternative to this three month live in program is the free 12 Step Journey Program, held Tuesday nights in Levittown and Saturday nights in Newtown.

http://www.12stepjourney.com/

The Salvation Army and similar faith based program has a higher rate of success than secular institutions such as the Penndel Mental Health Center.

Penndel Mental Health has been scouring the woods trying to drum up customers among the homeless. For this institution, becoming a mental health patient is the talisman to finding housing. Holy synthetic demand, Batman!

Upcoming Funding Time (parody of Fats Domino’s Finger Popping Time).

It’s upcoming funding time

It’s upcoming funding ti-eyem

I feel so good

I’m on the public dime

Hey now hey now hey now hey now

Here comes Allen here comes Keith

Here comes Chris and here comes the heat

It’s upcoming funding time

It’s upcoming funding ti-eyem

I feel so good

I’m on the public dime

Hey now hey now hey now hey now…

Years ago, I worked part time in a methodone (heroine addiction) clinic. I had a good possibility of working there as a counselor. One of the counselors sat down with me after work and talked with me about counseling people and showed me some literature. It turned me off and I did not pursue the counselling positioning.

One of the problems was that what I read actually mocked the idea that we have character flaws and the need to admit them and ask God to help us overcome them. An alternative is to blame problems on others.

Many of the kids mentioned at my high school reunion were clients, as the director called them, at the clinic. This helps verify my call that the clinic’s methods were flawed. They were based on human, not God’s ideas.

Is it better to burn yourself out or to fade away?

My my, hey hey…

Please Mr. Wizard (I don’t want to be homeless)

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This reference will date me, but back in the late 50’s or early 60’s, when I was a kid, there was a cartoon, with a moral (like many things during that era) called Mr Wizard.  In each episode, a character asked Mr. Wizard to make him something he’d rather be than a boy.

In one episode, for example, Mr. Wizard granted the boy’s wish and made him a bird.  The boy wanted to fly and be free.  For awhile, he enjoyed it, but when a hawk swooped down on him to devour him, the boy pleaded “Please Mr. Wizard, take me back.  I don’t want to be a bird!”

By choice, I have become homeless, living in my car for the past few months.  Because a sickly person has nowhere to go, and can’t stay in a home with me, we’ve been sleeping in my car.

As I mentioned in a previous blog, my first “homeless” experience occurred when I spent a night on a walkway besides a business off a main street in Levittown, PA.   After this experience, a homeless woman said “Jeff, just because you spent one night” on the street, you haven’t fully experienced what it’s like to be homeless.

Now I have a better idea of what it’s like to be homeless.

It can really suck eggs!  Please, Mr. Wizard, take me back.  I don’t want to be a homeless person!

Things you take for granted, such as having a bathroom a few feet away, where you can do your business, bathe, get hot water to soak your feet, having a refrigerator where you can store perishables, have a table and lots of storage space for food, medicines, and other items, are missing in this equation.  You don’t have a desk or place to keep papers.  If you want to eat hot food, you have to eat out or pay cash at a store and eat in your car, which I find, has limited space.  You get to drive a hybrid — both a bed and a form of transportation.

There are many people in this position — in cars, in tents, or out on the streets.  According to a Bucks County  preliminary point in time count for homeless people, released January 26, 2015, the preliminary count for unsheltered people for 2015 is 38.  In 2013 this count was 41, and for 2014 was 28.  The unsheltered are people who “self- report they will be staying in their cars or outside or outdoors the evening of the count”, according to the county report.

People are unsheltered because the local shelters are full, and there is nowhere else to go except their cars, tents in the woods or out in the street with sleeping gear.

Unfortunately, Mr. Wizard is not here to take them back.  I know many people in Bucks County may not be living in the real world, especially the people running the county, but Mr. Wizard is fictional (hate to break it to you).

What is real is Gimmee Shelter for the Homeless.  If you are really serious about helping your fellow Americans who happen to be homeless, please go to the link below.  You can skip the ad after a few seconds.

http://www.gofundme.com/lq6sfc

 

 

How does it Feel? (to be homeless)

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“How does it feel

To be on your own

A complete unknown

Like a rolling stone

No direction home”

 

-Bob Dylan

 

From 2007 to 2010, according to Family Services of Bucks County, the homeless population in lower Bucks County increased 81 percent.  And there has been a net growth ever since.

The shelter in Levittown, run by Family Services of Bucks County, has a long waiting line to get in.  Consequently, many people are out on the street — on sidewalks in front of buildings, in tents, and in their cars in parking lots.

HOW DOES IT FEEL to be homeless?

Not very good and something that people generally don’t plan on.

What makes it worse is the stigma and sterotypes that are cast (like that first stone).

As if homelessness isn’t bad enough, there are some people who add insult to injury.  Recently, I met two homeless people in a fast food restaurant.  One of them was forced to leave a job.  People who had seen her at the restaurant she frequented informed her workplace that she was homeless.    Meanspirted people taunted her:  “she’s the homeless girl, she stinks…”

The homeless guy who was sitting at the woman’s table said his boss knows he’s homeless, and doesn’t have a problem with that.  The boss told the man he was a good worker.  He recently started a job and struggles to find shelter.

And that’s what should count.

Martin Luther King said to judge people by the content of their character.   That’s something I was taught growing up, even before I heard Dr. King say it.

Being homeless does not equal depravity.  In mid Victorian England, being in the lower class meant you were a lower form of life.  Someone with money and fame, however, was championed in that culture and defects in character were covered by this.  Decades ago, when I was young and foolish, I sampled some Jamacian Gold (pot) when I visited Jamaca.  It started raining and the guy who gave me the sample remarked “it’s raining, but you are covered by the smoke”.

Today, we throw up a smoke screen and exuse dilliances of the rich and famous.  But the homeless are looked down on by some, just because they, to quote Henry “Frogman” Thomas “ain’t got no home.”

I’ve found some homeless people to be civil.  Many are industrious.  They work when they have the opportunity.  Many times, you cannot tell that a person is homeless.  On one occasion, as I talked to a Bucks County official, a guy walking by joked around with us.  He asked if we were guarding his expensive car we were standing by.  When I told the official the man was homeless, he remarked “I thought he was a counselor.”

By contrast, a high school student who had raided a local Wawa with the rest of the after school mob recklessly crashed into a man, spilling the man’s coffee all over him.  The punk just kept going, not even stopping to apologize.  I don’t believe he was homeless.

The homeless are people just like you and I, which any of us could be some day.  They are in a difficult situation, and they need acceptance and encouragement.  Job hunting is difficult enough for us who have homes, as after many failed attempts one tends to get discouraged.  The homeless have the extra burden of not having a castle to come home to.

There are people out there who have been gracious to the homeless.  For example volunteers from the Advocates for the Homeless and Those in Need (AHTN) and the hosts of the community meals that AHTN buses them to.  They not only help supply their material needs, but talk with the homeless and show their concern and encourage them to perservere.  They get to know them and give them a direction home.

The biggest concern for the homeless is shelter.  This is where Gimmee Shelter for the Homeless comes in.  We plan to acquire and develop property and earmark it for the homeless, with them helping themselves.

If you want to help the homeless get off the streets, please visit our crowd funding site.  We need funds for items such as materials, property and filing fees.  Volunteers, including us and the homeless, will do most of the work.

You can visit this site by clicking above on the Gimmee Shelter for the Homeless hyperlink.

The ads, which you can skip after a few seconds, help with funding the homeless.