The Solution for The Drug Epidemic is God

Everywhere you turn, you hear about places that deal with addictions.  There are many varieties. Some are fancy schmancy. There’s one ad on TV that starts with soft, soothing music looks like someone is about to get acupuncture, there’s a pool and a gym – a fancy resort! There are other places that are in more humble and simple settings.

In cases such as heroin addiction methadone is needed to curb cravings and make addicts more stable. Addiction becomes a medical problem in part.  Besides physical addiction, there is the battle in the mind. Methadone is just a temporary fix, or should be, to help those engaged in voluntary slavery to be redeemed.

The opioid and other drug abuse crisis is a spiritual problem.  Our country has turned away from God. People have stopped going to church, and even many who do, don’t attend a Bible believing church.

Just as our nation has been turning away from God, addictions have been exploding out of control.

In King of Prussia, PA., where I grew up, drug addiction really started taking off in the early 70s. Some new kids on the block corrupted their last name and proudly called themselves “the Doper-racks.”

The rotten fruits of the true church losing its influence on the country hasn’t been the case just in the past few decades.  In the 1920s and 30s America experienced the gangster epidemic. In the 1920s the church turned away from God, lacking fidelity to scripture, dead to the Word. My mother used to call these liberal churches “social clubs.”

An example of the churches falling off from God’s word was the Presbyterian churches. In the 1920s, the once theologically sound Princeton Theological Seminary caved to pressure to come down to the level of the mainstream Presbyterian churches at the time. They had polluted the church with modern liberalism. Instead of being a light in a dark world, the church turned the light off to the truth, leaving people in darkness.

One former Princeton professor who walked in the light was J. Gresham Machen, who went against the grain and took flack in order to take a stand against liberalism in the church.

The history, as found on the Westminster Theological Seminary website: https://www.wts.edu/history/

After Dr. Machen lost his position at Princeton and his church charged him with insubordination and removed his credentials as a minister, he took some bright young scholars with him and crossed the river to start Westminster Theological Seminary, just outside of Philadelphia in 1929.

In his book “Christianity and Liberalism”, Dr. Machen declared that liberalism teaches not a lesser form of Christianity, but an entirely different religion.

The worldly answer to alcohol abuse was the government decreeing prohibition, eliminating the supply. I wonder if anyone called it “alcohol abuse disorder”? Likewise, today authorities think they can resolve the drug problem simply by pushing out the pusher.

It was ministering to broken people that helped get Christianity back on track, more scriptural.

To help people overcome the enslaving sin of alcohol abuse, a Christian minster founded “A First Century Christian Fellowship” in 1921, 14 years before Alcoholics Anonymous was established.

And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit, addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ,” Ephesians 5:18-20 Ephesians

The original 12 Steps, influenced by A First Century Christian Fellowship, which later became known as The Oxford Group, made regular reference to God. Bill Wilson, co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, greatly minimized the use of God in the program.

The Oxford Group’s Philosophy:
*All people are sinners

*All sinners can be changed

*Confession is a prerequisite to change

*The change can access God directly

*Miracles are again possible

*The change must change others

Enter the Biblical Counseling movement circa 1970

For more than 45 years, the founder, pastor Jay E Adams has been promoting Christian counseling using the words of Jesus rather than psychological theory. Dr. Adams was a professor at Westminster Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania and the director of the Doctoral program at Westminster Seminary in California. He is also the founder of the Christian Counseling and Educational Foundation in Philadelphia, the National Association of Nouthetic Counselors, and the Institute for Nouthetic Studies. http://www.nouthetic.org/about-ins/our-faculty/8-about-ins/6-jay-adams-biography

In his book, How to Help People Change, Dr. Adams wrote “…generally your counseling itself should demonstrate that the Bible has the answers to human problems, and that, when properly used, it provides the practical solutions to the exigencies of life.”

But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have become convinced of, because you know those from whom you learned it, and how from infancy you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” 2 Timothy 3:14-17

In the Bible-based tradition of the Oxford Group and Dr. Adams is CLPRM, which has been reaching out to addicts. Here’s their philosophy:  http://www.clprm.org/what-we-believe/

The faith community in Bucks County will come together to reach out to addicts on Saturday, October 13 at Cairn University in Langhorne, PA at Bucks County Faith Summit II; The Faith Community and Addiction – What You Can Do. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/bucks-county-faith-summit-ii-lower-bucks-co-tickets-50166620713

Events such as Bucks County Faith Summit II and counseling will be enhanced by attending a Bible believing church, one that doesn’t succumb to every whim of doctrine,  Bible studies, prayer, Christian music and fellowship. Counseling, as Dr. Adams explains in “Critical Stages of Biblical Counseling”, is basically a pit stop to take care of problems that slow down progressive sanctification so the putting off of sinful ways and putting on Godly ways can continue in the church and other venues that help the believer become more Christ-like.

Jesus didn’t die on the cross to save “good” people, but sinners. Addicts are no different than anybody else.

“if my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven, and I will forgive their sin and will heal their land.”  2 Chronicles 7:14

Once I Built a Railroad

“Once I built a railroad, I made it run
Made it race against time
Once I built a railroad, now it’s done
Brother, can you spare a dime”

–Popular song during The Great Depression

The song was written in 1930, a year after the stock market crashed and ushered in the depression.

The stock market crashed is an oversimplified explanation of  the cause of the Great Depression. It’s not like a train crash. Instead, it was the result of progressive government overreach that started with President Herbert Hoover, whose claim to fame is the Hooverville developments – shanty towns built by homeless people, most of whom were out of work because of wrong headed government policy.

President FDR, who lied about reversing Hoover’s policies, became more of a progressive than Hoover. He was Hoover on steroids! Enter President Harry Truman, who took more of a free market approach than did Hoover or Roosevelt, and our country prospered.

During the depression, there was great immorality and hate. We became a police state, not a whole lot different than Nazi Germany and The Soviet Union, but on a smaller scale. For example, a business owner was arrested for charging customers 35 cents for an item instead of the government mandated 40 cents. Government storm troopers regularly went into businesses to keep them in line with the government.

As a result of government policies, “normal” people became hobos, today called homeless. They hopped freight trains and camped out. Railroad cops went after them, much like the authorities go after today’s homeless. The cops sometimes beat the hobos, who had become poor because Uncle Sam confiscated a lot of money, which was used to build the railroad.

What created the monster that wreaked havoc on our nation back then? This is not a rhetorical question. The monster was a product of an immoral, godless nation. This was also the case in Germany at the time.

In the late 19th and early 20th century, a toxic movement known as modernism crept into our society. Modernism rejects God and moral absolutes. Modernism also rejects realism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modernism

Transforming society, from commerce to philosophy was the goal of modernism. It was reflected in literature. Take Virginia Woolf. Please! She was one of the foremost modernists of the 20th century, an upper class elitist whose first novel was published in 1915. In college, I was required to read her To the Lighthouse, published in 1927. It is an incoherent rant, mainly against men. The novel spewed out a nihilistic view of life.

Modernism started polluting the church.  In 1929 Princeton Theological Seminary, after years of sound, Biblical teaching,  “was reorganized under modernist influences.” http://www.wts.edu/about/history.html

Almost immediately after the seminary went the way of the modernist world, Westminster Theological Seminary was established in Philadelphia, PA (actually right outside the Philly border), whose goal is to adhere to the fidelity of scripture.

In time, our nation was blessed with more of a true, Christian influence. The Great Depression was officially over in 1941, and gradually life in our country got better. It was a more peaceful time. Families stayed and prayed together. As was the case in the 19th century, most churches taught the truth of God. People went to these churches and read the Bible and Christian authors such as C.S. Lewis.

Christianity had the upper hand on our society by the 1950s. But, alas, the Blue Meanies don’t completely go away. Between 1955-1956, Beat poet Allen Ginsberg wrote his nihilistic poem Howl, which is essentially an extremely long run on sentence. Howl became the hippies national anthem.

I, like Allen Ginsberg, have seen the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness.

Although the counter culture pointed out some valid problems, its remedy is worse than the disease.

Today, the counter culture has permeated our country. In fact, now it is run by 60’s radicals, one who is the president and one who is running for president, to name two. I heard at least one praising FDR and wanting to be just like him.

We need to take our country back! No matter what your present state, even if you are homeless, find a Bible preaching church, and check what is preached by studying the Bible yourself. Go to Bible studies. Pray. If we all did this, we’d have a better society!

“Trouble pursues the sinner, but the righteous are rewarded with good things.”

-Proverbs 13:21